Volunteers

Chelwood welcomes volunteers to join us in our work in school.

A school volunteer could be a parent or carer, or family member of a child at the school, or could be a member of our local community who wants to make a difference, and contribute to the learning experiences of our children.

There are lots of ways in which volunteers can become involved in school life.

Some volunteers work with the children alongside the staff in the classes, and other volunteers help ‘behind the scenes’.

 

‘Helping Hands’ (- Behind the Scenes)

Parents and carers, and Friends of Chelwood, are invited to join staff to do a range of practical tasks that help the school run smoothly and contribute to the children’s learning.  These activities include:

  • sorting our puzzles,
  • mending books,
  • cutting painting paper,
  • ironing display drapes and table cloths,
  • sorting, making and cataloging resources,
  • making things for fundraising activities.

 

Sharing your skills and expertise

Some volunteers join staff to share their particular skills.

Recent activities have included:

  • children’s yoga sessions,
  • dance and movement,
  • music and singing sessions,
  • cooking,
  • playing with light and shadows
  • gardening
  • walks in our locality to hunt for sounds, signs of Spring, visit the Library
  • pond dipping in our Wildlife Garden.
  • helping to maintain our school library and resources;
  • supporting with administrative tasks,
  • domestic tasks such as laundry
  • carpentry
  • marketing and advertising advice
  • communications expertise
  • fundraising support
  • event planning

 

Gardening Club

The Gardening Club is a group of willing volunteers who join staff, to help maintain the school garden and our natural learning environment. The Gardening Club get involved in pruning, weeding, seasonal planting of pots, planters and hanging baskets, caring for the pond and wild life area and tending the vegetable garden. The frequency of sessions depends on the season and the needs of the garden. Some work can take place with children, where volunteers have DBS checks, although some work takes places out of school time, dependent on the task.

 

Working with children

Some volunteers contribute a regular time each week to work alongside staff in the classes with the children. The class staff support and supervise volunteers as they play alongside the children,  share stories, make music, dress up and role play etc.

Out and About

Assisting on local trips and visits
regular volunteers can work alongside staff to support the children’s learning by assisting to take children on local trips to the library and shops, to places of interest such as Frendsbury Gardens and One Tree Hill and pond-dipping in the school wildlife garden. Going out for short walks to find numbers or letters in the local area, to see the changes in the seasons, to record sounds heard in the locality,  or to see the changes in local building projects are important parts of the children’s learning about their local area.

How do I become a School Volunteer?

If you would like to be a school volunteer please contact me, Nikki Oldhams, Headteacher.

If you have some time that you could commit on a regular basis to help in school, we would be very pleased to hear from you.

This kind of voluntary work may be useful if you are considering applying for childcare college courses.

Anyone assisting in school on a regular basis would of course have to complete the necessary Disclosure and Barring Scheme (formerly Criminal Records Bureau), and reference checks as part of the school’s  procedures to ensure we safeguarded of the children’s welfare.

 

Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of young children

This school is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and young people, and expects all staff and volunteers to share this commitment.
All staff and volunteers working at Chelwood have the mandatory Disclosure and Barring Scheme (formerly Criminal Records Bureau), checks to ensure they have no criminal convictions that would make them unsuitable for working with young children.